Tips for a good bladder and bowel health

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Our continence support team have shared some tips to help parents of children with disabilities support their child’s bladder and bowel health:

  • Encourage your child to drink enough fluid to for their age and body weight
  • Encourage a diet rich in fruits and vegetables
  • Consider other options if your child has difficulty swallowing or has sensory preferences for other fluids or high liquid / frozen foods
  • Being physically active will encourage bowel activity and reduce the risk of constipation. If you child has mobility problems abdominal massage may be helpful
  • Keep a check on your child’s bowel movements. Ideally poo should be soft and easy to pass (think of a ripe banana)
  • Commence a toileting program with your child. Occupational therapists and the PEBBLES team can provide advice on toileting equipment to ensure that your child can sit comfortably and safely on the toilet
  • If your child has sensory issues around toileting speak with their Occupational Therapist, or make a referral to PEBBLES for more information on how to address these issues
  • Discuss your child’s bladder and/or bowel problems with their doctor

therapist shows booklet to child and motherNot sure where to start? Therapy Focus’ PEBBLES team provide specialist advice and support to children with a disability who experience bladder and bowel health issues, continence issues and those who require support with toilet training. Find out more.

For further information and support contact the National Continence Helpline on 1800 33 00 66 or visit www.continence.org.au.

 

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